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The September 15th deadline looms for those struggling with student debt to get some relief from Maryland.

Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot says the Student Loan Debt Relief Tax Credit is open to any state resident who has at least $5-thousand to pay on their student loans.

He said, “This is a new program and it’s obviously not a cure all. But it’s something that says the state of Maryland wants young people to know who have a lot of college debt that we’re on their side and we’d like to help them out.”

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Gov. Larry Hogan's administration is highlighting a Maryland program that enables young adults to cut student loan debt while buying a home.

The governor marked the anniversary of the Maryland SmartBuy 2.0 initiative on Tuesday.

A pilot program began in 2016. Hogan extended it in July of 2018. He put $3 million in the last fiscal year's budget for the program, and that has been doubled this fiscal year to $6 million.

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The average student debt for those getting a degree from Delaware colleges is rising at a faster rate than any other state over the ten years.

That’s according to the Institute for College Access and Success.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that between 2008 and 2016 the average college debt burden for graduates in the state has rising from around $20-thousand to just over $36-thousand.

That’s a 77 percent increase.

The Institute says that makes it the fifth highest in the country.

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Former president of the NAACP Ben Jealous has launched his bid to become governor of Maryland.

He made the announcement yesterday and he is the second Democrat join the race to unseat incumbent Republican Larry Hogan.

The 44 year-old Jealous has been an outspoken progressive who backed Bernie Sanders last year in the Democratic presidential primary.

Taking aim at Hogan he charged that the governor has aligned himself the extreme members of the President Trump’s administration.

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The new chancellor for the University of Maryland stopped by Salisbury University yesterday as the school system faces some potentially tight budgets.

Chancellor Robert Caret was upbeat about the prospects of expanding attendance and keeping down costs for students.

But while he expects the University system budget for the next fiscal year to remain flat there could be some cuts and an increase in tuition in the years ahead.