slavery

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland's Board of Public Works has approved a $100,000 grant for a memorial to abolitionist Frederick Douglass.

The board voted on Wednesday on the proposed grant from Maryland Historical Trust's African American Heritage Preservation Program.

The memorial is being built in the plaza in front of Hornbake Library at the University of Maryland College Park campus. It will be called Frederick Douglass Square.

The memorial will feature Douglass quotations on a steel wall, paving stones, planting beds, and benches.

Don Rush

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Maryland's Board of Public Works is scheduled to vote on a $100,000 grant for a memorial to abolitionist Frederick Douglass.

The Board will vote Wednesday on the proposed grant from Maryland Historical Trust's African American Heritage Preservation Program.

The memorial is being built in the plaza in front of Hornbake Library at the University of Maryland College Park campus. It will be called Frederick Douglass Square.

The memorial will feature Douglass quotations on a steel wall, paving stones, planting beds, and benches.

government photograph

FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - Frederick city officials are considering a proposal to remove from City Hall a sculpture of the U.S. Supreme Court justice who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery.

The plan proposed last week by Alderman Donna Kuzemchak (koo-ZAM'-chak) is on the agenda for Wednesday's workshop meeting of the Board of Alderman. No decision is expected.

Supporters of the proposal say they equate the bust of Roger Brooke Taney (TAW'-ney) with the Confederate battle flag.

government photograph

FREDERICK, Md. (AP) - A Frederick alderwoman is renewing a call for removing a statue of U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney from City Hall.

Taney wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision upholding slavery. The ruling became a catalyst for the Civil War.  It called black people "beings of an inferior order."

Taney practiced law in Frederick from 1801 to 1823.

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DELMAR, Del. (AP) - Dozens of Confederate flag supporters held a rally Saturday as they drove to the Delaware Confederate veterans monument in Georgetown.

The Wilmington News Journal  reports that more than more 40 drivers participated in the procession. The drivers started in Delmar and then drove to Harrington and Georgetown.

Organizer Kenneth Morris, with the Sussex County Mudslingerz organization, says he was helping to lead the rally in order to defend what he called his "heritage."

Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles

DANVILLE, Va. (AP) - A judge in the Virginia city that was the final refuge for the Confederacy is set to hear arguments over the state's bid to erase the Confederate battle flag from license plates.

The hearing Friday in Danville comes as the city grapples with the enduring symbols of the Confederacy, a debate sparked across the South by the killings of nine African-Americans in a Charleston, South Carolina, church in June.

The suspect in the shootings had been photographed posing with a Confederate battle flag.

An Apology for Slavery?

Jul 8, 2015
Historical drawing

There could be an apology for slavery in Delaware.

Governor Jack Markell received a request for such a proclamation last week from Harmon Carey, founder and executive director of the Afro-American Historical Society in Wilmington.

The Wilmington News Journal reports that he wrote that there was a “moral imperative”0 to acknowledge the inhumanity of slavery and the unjust prosecution of Abolitionists.

Carey says he believes an apology would heal the wounds still being felt to this day.

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DOVER, Del. (AP) - Gov. Jack Markell's office is mulling a request to pardon three 19th-century Delawareans convicted of helping smuggle slaves.

Pennsylvania resident Robert Seeley has asked Markell to pardon his ancestor, Thomas Garrett, a prominent Quaker abolitionist credited with helping more than 2,700 slaves reach freedom. Seeley also is seeking pardons for John Hunn and his partner, Samuel Burris, a free black man. Hunn was convicted with Garrett in 1848 for aiding a slave family.

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WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) - A descendant of a Delaware man credited with helping more than 2,700 slaves reach freedom is asking Gov. Jack Markell to pardon his ancestor and two others.

Sixty-four-year-old Robert Seeley of Havertown, Pennsylvania, got the idea after outgoing Illinois' governor granted clemency on New Year's Eve to three abolitionists convicted for hiding and helping escaped slaves.

Seeley says he sent Markell his request on Facebook on New Year's Day, and then again in an email Monday.

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BALTIMORE (AP) - Maryland is celebrating the 150th anniversary marking the end of slavery in the state, a milestone that came after the Emancipation Proclamation.

While President Abraham Lincoln signed the proclamation in January 1863, slavery remained in place for many states, including Maryland.

Maryland amended its constitution on Nov. 1, 1864, more than a year before slavery was abolished nationwide with the 13th Amendment.

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This evening the Seaford Town Council is set to vote on whether to put up a monument to former slave and abolitionist Harriet Tubman.

Jim Blackwell, a local historian told WBOC, that on October 22nd, 1856 Tubman passed through Seaford aboard the Steamer Kent a boat that came from Baltimore.

He said that she brought with her a slave named Tilly who was trying to escape from the south.

Blackwell said that Tubman brought Tilly to the only hotel in Seaford.

That plot of land is located at the Gateway Park across from the town hall.

Don Rush

Site

In Easton, archeologists from the University of Maryland and researchers at Morgan State are carrying out small excavations to uncover evidence of what could be the oldest neighborhood of free African Americans in the country.

The Hill

The neighborhood known as The Hill claims the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church established in 1818 and the home of Grace Brooks, a free black woman, who bought a home there in 1792. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush visited the site and prepared this report:

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