coronavirus

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The conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq became not only the longest wars but with a volunteer army inwhich service personnel have seen numerous tours of duty. Meanwhile, for the public they are the almost forgotten conflicts with such a small percentage of the population serving in the military. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush talks with Ashleigh Birnes, deputy communications director for Disabled American Veterans, about the impact of such wars amidst the current coronavirus pandemic. (Part 2)

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Rallies have been a hallmark of President Trump's campaign with many of the attendees not wearing masks. And, the president has said he is feeling well enough to resume the campaign trail. Delmarva Public Media' Don Rush talked with emergency room physician Mike Murphy about the those rallies and the prospect that his health could take a turn for the worse.

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President Trump says that he is ready to get back out on the campaign trail and has decided not to not to participate in the second presidential debate since the decision by the Commission on Presidential Debates that it be virtual. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush talked with emergency room physician Mike Murphy about someone who has had coronavirus breaking quarantine so soon. (part 2)

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President Trump is now back in the White House after contracting the coronavirus. His physicians have given him a series of drugs including a sterioid to fight the disease. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush spoke with Mike Murphy, an emergency room physician, about what we can tell of the president's condition and treatment. (Part 1)

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President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania have tested positive for the coronavirus. The White House now says that the president is experiencing mild symptoms. Delmarva Today host Don Rush talks with Salisbury University Political Science professor Michael O'Loughlin and longtime Wicomico County Republican John Bartkovich about the news and its political implications.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has tweeted that he and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the coronavirus.

Trump’s positive test comes just hours after the White House announced that senior aide Hope Hicks came down with the virus after traveling with the president several times this week.  

Trump is 74 years old, putting him at higher risk of serious complications from a virus that has now killed more than 205,000 people nationwide.

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As the nation prepares to enter the winter months with the coronavirus still raging, the nation will still be suffering from another -- the opioid crisis. Sandy Brown, executive director of Mid-Shore Pro Bono which privides free legal services, says these two have made the situation much worse. In addition, Brown tells Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush that she expects a homeless crisis to follow as the nation moves into months more of the virus pandemic. (Part 2)

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Despite the federal moratorium on evictions and state assistance many on the Eastern Shore are struggling to find money to pay their rents or mortgages. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush talked with Sandy Brown, executive director of Mid-Shore Pro Bono, which provides free legal services. She says while the moratoriums help out, the bills still pile up. (Part 1)

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American farmers have been hit twice over the last few years. First it was the impact of the trade battles with China. Then, the coronavirus. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush talked with Patrick Criteser, President & CEO of Tillamook County Creamery Association, about how agriculture is fairing in these tough times.

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The coronavirus has isolated many and shutdown this year's events around the country.  As a result, the National Folk Festival is going virtual this weekend. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush talked with Lora Bottinelli, executive director of the National Council for the Traditional Arts, about its significance in these times and what the future may hold. (Part 2)

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The New York Times reports on August 26, 2020   that as colleges and universities open for the fall, data in a survey conducted of more than 1,500 American colleges and universities has revealed at least 26,000 coronavirus cases since the pandemic began. The Times has counted more than 20,000 additional cases at colleges since late July.

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The AARP has sharply criticized the handling of the coronavirus in nursing homes by Delaware authorities. Of the total number of virus deaths in the state they account for over 60 percent. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush talked with Sheila Grant, associate state director for advocacy in the Delaware office, about conditions found in these long term care facilities. (Part 2)

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The AARP has called the nursing homes in Delaware a Petri dish over the handling of the coronavirus pandemic. With over 60 percent of the Covid-19 deaths in Delaware occurring in long term facilities, Sheila Grant, AARP's associate state director of advocacy told Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush that more must be done to curb the spread. (Part 1)

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Hal Wilson’s guest on Delmarva Today is Doctor Michael Murphy, an emergency medical physician affiliated with the Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, MD. Dr. Murphy is a frequent guest on Delmarva Today and we’re pleased to welcome him back to update us on the pandemic in the Wicomico area, and to discuss the development of a vaccine as well as the efficacy of any recent treatments such as convalescent plasma.

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With the coronavirus pandemic telehealth has become more popular. Gillian Sealy, CEO of the non-profit Power to Decide, found that there is an increasing number of patients taking advantage of this new technology.

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Maryland Governor Larry Hogan has declared Saturdays in September "Buy Maryland Seafood Days" as watermen adapt to the changing market due to the coronavirus. Simon Dean, president of the Calvert County Watermen's Association, tells Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush that some markets have been lost as watermen try to adapt to the changing economic climate.

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With the school term about to begin, the Wicomico County Public School District has decided on a virtual reopening with most students learning on line. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush talks with Joan Smith, president of the Wicomico County Education Association, about how this may change the way we teach. (part 2)

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As students get ready to return to school, in Wicomico County the experience will essentally be virtual in the fall given the coronavirus pandemic. Delmarvia Public Media's Don Rush talks with Joan Smith, president of the Wicomico County Education Association, about the school district's plans for the fall semester. (Part 1)

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It seems that we live in a maelstrom of events that keep unfolding before our very eyes. Delmarma Public Media's essayist Steve Plotkin writes there doesn't seem to be a moment to rest against the overwhelming tide.

 Overwhelmed

This week there are so many problems on so many fronts, my
pen experienced sensory overload and simply shut down,
leaving me speechless.

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As the crowds gather in Ocean City for the tourist season local restaurants are still coping with the coronavirus including restricted seating and positive tests among employees. Susan Jones, executive director of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association, says owners are still hopeful despite the virus.

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As tourists flock to Ocean City many of the resort's restaurants reopened for business. But a number of them closed temporarily due to an employee testing positive for the coronavirus. Susan Jones, executive director of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association, described for Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush the efforts by these restaurants to keep ahead of the virus. (Part 1)

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These can be stressful times with the coronavirus keeping many at home and eating too much of the wong foods. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush talked with Anita Brickman, executive director of the CHPA Educational Foundation (knowyourotcs.org), about the current situation that can lead many to experience more heartburn.

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With the ever increasing number of coronavirus cases in the United States much is being learned about the diesease, particularly its after effects which can be long lasting. In the second part of Delmarva Public Media's Hall Wilson  discussion with emergency physician Mike Murphy they look at what is known for those who survive.

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The city of Salisbury held its first Third Friday event in downtown since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush reports there was a sparse crowd but many felt a sense of relief from the restrictions of the past few months.

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With the coronavirus deaths now topping 140,000 in the United States scientists are racing to find medicines to reduce the severity of the virus as well as racing to finding a vaccine. Delmarva Public Media's Hal Wilson talked with emergency physician Mike Murphy about what has been learned about the disease. (Part 1)

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The coronavirus has left the undocumented immigrant commnity scrambling for financial assistance as they have to take time off from work and and seek medical care. In Delaware, activists have set up the Delaware Immigrant Fund to provide that aid. Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush has this report. (Part 3)

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Undocumented immigrant women are often the stablizing force for their families. But, in part two of our series, Delmarva Public Media's Don Rush examines the impact of the coronavirus on their home lives. Charito Calvachi-Mateyko contributed interviewing and translation assistance for this series.

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With the number of coronavirus cases topping 3 million in the United States, undocumented immigrant women are struggling with the disease given their legal status. In part one of our series Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush takes a look at how the virus has impacted their employment in Delaware where many work in the poultry processing plants, interviewing a number of women from Guatemala about their lives. We had interviewing and translation assistance from Charito Calvachi-Mateyko for this feature.

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With the number of coronavirus cases now topping three million in the U.S with over 130,000 deaths, many states and local government officials are scrambling to keep up with the spreading pandemic. Delmarva Public Media Essayist Steve Plotkin writes it's time to be angry.

Our American Infodemic        

Our response to the pandemic is faltering, and already a world-class failure.  It is so bad that the EU and the world is placing America in quarantine and closing its borders to U.S. visitors.  Isn’t that incredible?

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The coronavirus has left many families mourning the loss of loved ones and a yearning for a return to life as they knew once it. But Delmarva Public Radio's George Merrill writes unlike other pandemics uncertainty clouds what will become the new normal.

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