Arts

Arts and culture

A 10-minute drive from the White House — where immigration has a top spot on the President's "to-do" list — a museum has filled three of its floors with artists' reactions to displacement, relocation and flight.

When you stand in the center of Plaza del Congreso in downtown Buenos Aires, looking at the dome of Argentina's Capitol building, there's an imposing grey ghost of a building just to the right. It's a deteriorating art nouveau masterpiece: the Edificio del Molino, closed for decades, and now in the middle of a multi-year restoration.

The restorers opened it to the public for just a few hours recently, and a crowd started lining up on the sidewalk hours early, two and three abreast. When the doors finally opened, the line stretched almost three blocks.

Talk about chutzpah. Two female mystery writers have just helped themselves to the titles of two novels written by canonical male authors, without even a please or a thank you.

Diver and photographer Jill Heinerth has explored unmapped, underwater caves deep in the earth, as well as the submerged crevices of an iceberg. She has seen hidden creatures and life forms that have never been exposed to the light of day.

"Since I was the smallest child, I always wanted to be an explorer — to have an opportunity to go someplace where nobody has ever been before," she says. "As an artist with my camera, it's an incredible opportunity to document these places and bring back images to share with others."

These three romance novels are perfect for the homestretch of summer, when it's too hot to go outside and all you want to do is lie under the air conditioner with a book. Whether in the Wild West or big city, online or IRL, these three stories show that romance and happy ever afters are everywhere — if you dare to reach for them.

What is lurking beneath Herbert Powyss' house?

That's the question at the center of British author Alix Nathan's novel, The Warlow Experiment. Powyss is a country gentleman. He prefers gardens and books to people; spends his days designing hothouses for his estate, growing exotic seeds, grafting pear trees and submitting minor horticultural findings to the world's preeminent scientific body, the Royal Society.

Memories Of Home: Share Yours As A Poem

Aug 19, 2019

Writers draw on memories to create some of their best work.

Morning Edition wants to hear your memories of home and where you come from — through poetry.

Draw on all five senses. Share with us the people or places or smells that define your home. Be original!

Here's an example from NPR's resident poet Kwame Alexander.

"I am from words and art and books
"I am from discipline and hard work; the sound of coins in a jar"

There are comedy creators whose sensibilities are darker than Danny McBride's. There are some whose satire is sharper, some whose characterizations are weaker, some whose sense of the moment is more or less developed. But there is no one more convinced than Danny McBride of the raw, unstoppable comedic power of male nudity — both frontal and rear.

"Sometimes, I feel I got to get away," sang the Who in their 1965 single "The Kids Are Alright," and no wonder the song became an instant classic for the youth of Townshend and Daltrey's g-g-g-generation — teenagers of every age tend toward the restive, longing to experience life beyond whichever town or city they were raised in.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Saida Dahir from Salt Lake City is a student activist who uses spoken word to explore her place in America and the world. On the eve of her high school graduation, she recorded this poem.

(SOUNDBITE OF POEM, "THE WALKING STEREOTYPE")

At one point in his hilariously searing novel Black Card, Chris L. Terry pauses the narrative to issue a list of what makes certain people racist.

When is it wrong to show cigarette smoking on television, but OK to depict people smoking cannabis products, particularly in programming popular among young teenagers?

A young man clowns around with a bicycle or two. Cardi B strikes a pose. A man in a camouflage uniform blends into camouflage wallpaper but the flowers he holds are an explosion of color.

Sheila, the narrator of Kimberly King Parson's story "Guts," can't run away from bodies: not her own, not others'. Ever since she started dating Tim, a medical student, "all the sick, broken people in the world begin to glow." She imagines tumors and incipient heart attacks in strangers, all the while remaining conscious of her own body, which fails to bring her joy: "I should love my body more," she reflects, but she doesn't.

Actor Peter Fonda, best-known for his iconic role as a free-spirited motorcycle rider in the 1969 counterculture classic Easy Rider, died Friday at his home in Los Angeles at the age of 79. The cause of his death was respiratory failure due to lung cancer, according to a family statement released to People magazine.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

The writer-director Richard Linklater has said that he cast Cate Blanchett in his new comedy, Where'd You Go, Bernadette, because, in his words, "only a genius can portray a genius believably."

Ever since George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series stole our hearts, minds, and television screens, fantasy literature has gained a reputation for being so grim and dark that there's a whole subgenre of it called, unimaginatively, grimdark. But it was not always thus. Granted, in the '70s and '80s, fantasy contained plenty of proto-grimdark works, most notably Stephen R. Donaldson's The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant and Roger Zelazny's Amber books.

Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy

Aug 16, 2019

Quebec-born, Polish-descenced, and now a New York local, the trilingual food enthusiast Antoni Porowski is best known as one fifth of Queer Eye's fab five. In each episode, this enthusiastic group sets out to transform the life of one woefully unkempt "hero." Each member of the team has a niche and, although he isn't professionally trained, Porowski serves as the show's food and wine connoisseur. Now that Porowski has worked in this role over the show's four seasons, to date, he's gearing up to release his own cookbook: Antoni in the Kitchen.

M&Ms

Aug 16, 2019

In this final round every word begins and ends with the letter M.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Antoni

Aug 16, 2019

Queer Eye's food and wine expert Antoni Porowski returns to the stage to play a multiple choice game about one of his favorite dog breeds, corgis.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

Shine On, You Crazy Neil Diamond

Aug 16, 2019

Upon the news that a Neil Diamond musical is in development, guest musician Julian Velard jumps into action with a music parody reworking Neil Diamond hits to make them about other real people with Broadway musicals based on them.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

Double-O No!

Aug 16, 2019

In this word game, every answer is a two-word phrase in which the first word contains a double-O. One of the Os is removed to create the second word.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

To All The Bays I've Loved Before

Aug 16, 2019

Ophira Eisenberg and guest announcer Cecil Baldwin read love notes addressed to geographic B-A-Y bays, written as if they were B-A-E baes — accompanied with some very sensual sax by guest musician Julian Velard.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

Straight from the Greek

Aug 16, 2019

Contestants are given commonplace English words and are asked to correctly identify their obscure Greek origin.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

I was excited to get my hands on a copy of The Silence Between Us, as I had yet to review a book for this column featuring a deaf protagonist. I was doubly delighted to know that the story had been written by someone who is herself part of the deaf community — Alison Gervais suffered permanent hearing loss at a very young age, and is hard of hearing. Even the book's cover image is #OwnVoices, designed by deaf artist Nancy Rourke. I was absolutely ready to lose myself in a good book that both respected and celebrated deaf culture, and I was not disappointed.

You're at brunch with your friends on Sunday morning and after stuffing yourself with pancakes and mimosas, your server comes up to you and says, "Is this going to be on one check or — "

"Separate!" you all proclaim, barely taking a breath to pause from your conversation.

And why would you? It's pretty customary to pay for your own meal, or to go Dutch.

But it wasn't always the norm to split the check when going out with friends. In fact, in early English society, it was seen as selfish to invite someone out to eat and not pay for their meal.

"There is never any end," John Coltrane said sometime in the mid-1960s, at the height of his powers. "There are always new sounds to imagine; new feelings to get at." Coltrane, one of jazz's most revered saxophonists, was speaking to Nat Hentoff about an eternal quest — a compulsion to reach toward the next horizon, and the next.

Two things stand out about Olga Tokarczuk's novel Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead. The first is that the book, first published in Polish in 2009 and newly translated by Antonia Lloyd-Jones, doesn't seem dated in the slightest; in fact, it fits rather well into much more contemporary literary concerns about nature and the impact humans have on it, and the cruelty of hunting and killing animals (Lauren Groff's wonderful Florida comes to mind).

Think true crime, but with diseases instead of murderers.

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