All Things Considered

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During Hurricane Harvey, many Houston residents found out the hard way that their homes and businesses were within the flood plains of reservoirs built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Some property owners blame the Corps for the damage to their buildings, and they want compensation. The trial plays out this week. Houston Public Media's Andrew Schneider has more on the legal strategy.

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During Hurricane Harvey, many Houston residents found out the hard way that their homes and businesses were within the flood plains of reservoirs built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Some property owners blame the Corps for the damage to their buildings, and they want compensation. The trial plays out this week. Houston Public Media's Andrew Schneider has more on the legal strategy.

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During Hurricane Harvey, many Houston residents found out the hard way that their homes and businesses were within the flood plains of reservoirs built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Some property owners blame the Corps for the damage to their buildings, and they want compensation. The trial plays out this week. Houston Public Media's Andrew Schneider has more on the legal strategy.

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During Hurricane Harvey, many Houston residents found out the hard way that their homes and businesses were within the flood plains of reservoirs built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Some property owners blame the Corps for the damage to their buildings, and they want compensation. The trial plays out this week. Houston Public Media's Andrew Schneider has more on the legal strategy.

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During Hurricane Harvey, many Houston residents found out the hard way that their homes and businesses were within the flood plains of reservoirs built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Some property owners blame the Corps for the damage to their buildings, and they want compensation. The trial plays out this week. Houston Public Media's Andrew Schneider has more on the legal strategy.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

During Hurricane Harvey, many Houston residents found out the hard way that their homes and businesses were within the flood plains of reservoirs built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Some property owners blame the Corps for the damage to their buildings, and they want compensation. The trial plays out this week. Houston Public Media's Andrew Schneider has more on the legal strategy.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Trump Announces New Immigration Plan

11 hours ago

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President Trump stood in the White House Rose Garden today and laid out a sweeping new immigration plan. It would change who gets to immigrate to the United States.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

After months of watching entry videos — over 6,000 of them — the judges of the fifth annual Tiny Desk Contest have chosen a winner!

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The 2020 Democratic presidential field keeps growing and growing. Twenty-two people are now angling for the Oval Office. Over the next several weeks, we're going to spend time getting to know some of those candidates better with help from the NPR Politics Podcast team. The team is working with New Hampshire Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio to interview candidates out on the campaign trail.

NPR's Scott Detrow kicks off the series with New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, and he's here in the studio to tell us how it went. Hey there, Scott.

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Officials in Grand Rapids, Mich., want to ban what they call racially biased 911 calls. The callers could face fines of up to $500. Michelle Jokisch Polo of member station WGVU reports.

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As more states legalize marijuana, more people in the U.S. are buying and using weed — and the kind of weed they can buy has become much stronger.

That concerns scientists who study marijuana and its effects on the body, as well as emergency room doctors who say they're starting to see more patients who come into the ER with weed-associated issues.

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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf about the impacts of the escalating trade war between the U.S. and China on Pennsylvania.

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Social media giants say they will work with heads of state to regulate extremist content that spreads online. One key player has refused to endorse the plan - the United States. NPR's Aarti Shahani reports.

The backlog in U.S. immigration courts is now over 850,000 cases long. People can wait years for their hearings. And that can be a long time to pay for a lawyer and to make appearances in court. Both of these things can be much harder for immigrants living in rural and mountainous parts of the West.

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At 7:51 a.m. Tuesday, after a federal judge weighed in the night before, the national rules governing distribution of donated livers to dying patients became a bit more equitable. Or at least, that was the intent of the United Network for Organ Sharing, which began revising the system in 2012.

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All right, Audie, help me out here. Name a city, five letters long, famous for its Cuban sandwiches.

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Miami.

SHAPIRO: Actually incorrect according to The New York Times.

CORNISH: Wait. What?

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Journalist Harriet Shawcross is fascinated by silence: why we speak, and why we don't.

She's traveled the world seeking answers to those questions, meeting earthquake survivors in Nepal, a silent order of nuns in Paris, a Buddhist retreat in Scotland. She's written a book about it, called Unspeakable: The Things We Cannot Say.

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On the night of Jan. 16, Liz O'Sullivan sent a letter she'd been working on for weeks. It was directed at her boss, Matt Zeiler, the founder and CEO of Clarifai, a tech company. "The moment before I hit send and then afterwards, my heart, I could just feel it racing," she says.

The letter asked: Is our technology going to be used to build weapons?

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