Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday. She is infamous in the IT department of NPR for losing laptops to bullets, hurricanes, and bomb blasts.

Before joining the Sunday morning team, she served as an NPR correspondent based in Brazil, Israel, Mexico, and Iraq. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage, and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement. She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton. She has also won awards for her work on migration in Mexico and the Amazon in Brazil.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-September 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. She was posted for the AP to Iraq before the U.S.-led invasion, where she stayed covering the conflict.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London.

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Roll over Spot, Buddy and Rover. Say hello to Cardi B, Harry and Groot! These are just some of 2018's popular names for dogs.

Kate Jaffe is a dog name curator for Rover, the dog and cat service provider. She says that this year pop culture dog name names are in.

"We saw the royal wedding surging as inspiration for dog names," she says. "In fact, dogs named Harry and Meghan were both up about 130 percent this year."

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The character of Jeeves is such a colossus of fiction that the name is actually a synonym for a personal manservant.

In P.G. Wodehouse's comic masterpieces, he was the unflappable valet to Bertie Wooster, the young English sophisticate who frequently got into capers and scrapes that only Jeeves could get him out of.

With the permission of the Wodehouse estate, there's a new Jeeves-and-Wooster novel out, this time written by bestselling author Ben Schott. He says it's a fictional world that means "everything" to him.

When she was first given the opportunity to play Queen Elizabeth I in the new film Mary Queen of Scots, Margot Robbie declined. "I found the prospect too intimidating," Robbie says. "I didn't really feel worthy." But after multiple conversations with director Josie Rourke, she changed her mind: "Eventually I was like, 'Look I trust you, I'm willing to give it a go,' " she recalls.

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This is Lulu's Log, stardate December 2, 2018, where we explore matters of space, the stars and the universe.

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In Liane Moriarty's new novel, nine strangers gather at a high-end wellness retreat looking for a 10-day transformation – and end up getting a lot more than they bargained for. Moriarty is the author of Big Little Lies among other bestsellers, and her new page-turner has already been snapped up by Nicole Kidman's production house. (Kidman starred in the HBO adaptation of Big Little Lies.)

Sometimes it seems like there's no role Benedict Cumberbatch can't play.

He's been an iconic British detective, he's been J.R.R. Tolkein's dragon Smaug, he's been Doctor Strange — and now Cumberbatch is back on the big screen, voicing the Grinch, the bright green grump in a new animated version of Dr. Seuss's famous Christmas tale.

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In the new film Unlovable, we witness the character Joy hit rock bottom because of an addiction to sex and love.

Help comes in the form of a support group, and an unlikely friendship where Joy learns to stop having unhealthy sex and starts making music. The movie's original songs are written by John Hawkes, who plays the character Jim.

Many journalists are given the title of war correspondent. Few have really deserved it as much as Marie Colvin.

Colvin was an American reporter who wrote for the British newspaper The Sunday Times. She was unmistakable in war zones — she sported an eye patch to cover up an eye injured in a grenade attack while she was reporting during the Sri Lankan civil war.

At the Cornell Lab of Ornithology there is an epic mural called simply The Wall of Birds. It's 100 feet wide and 40 feet tall, and it's the only mural in the world representing all 243 families of modern birds, along with depictions of their evolution over their 375-million-year history. And you don't have to go to Cornell to see it — the mural's birds are now available in book form.

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President Trump says he's planning to pull out of an international arms control agreement. As NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports, it's a treaty signed by President Reagan designed to reduce the dangers of nuclear war.

Jill Soloway is the Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning creator of the show Transparent, and also the co-creator and director of the show I Love Dick.

Their new memoir is called She Wants It: Desire, Power and Toppling the Patriarchy. And despite that title, let's note right away: "She" is not their preferred pronoun.

Vijay Gupta's life work has been to make music accessible to all.

That passion caught the attention of others and earlier this month the Los Angeles Philharmonic violinist was awarded a 2018 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship — also known as the genius grant.

At the Vdara Hotel and Spa in Las Vegas, robots are at the front line of room service. "Jett" and "Fetch" are delivery robots, designed to look like dogs, each about three feet high.

They can bring items from the hotel's cafe right to your room. Among their many capabilities, they can travel alone across the lobby, remotely call for an elevator, and even alert guests when they arrive at their hotel room through an automated phone message.

Over two decades ago in 1997, when violinist Hilary Hahn was 17, she made a celebrated recording debut, Hilary Hahn Plays Bach. That year, Hahn told NPR about her enthusiasm for Bach's music.

"There's nothing I really wanted to record more than Bach," Hahn said. "I can work on it for a long time and keep discovering more things that surprise me every time."

For all the talk of how Democrats running for re-election in states President Trump won are a protective shield for Senate Republicans, Nevada's Dean Heller has the opposite problem.

He is the only Republican senator up for re-election in a state that Democrat Hillary Clinton won in 2016. The candidate challenging him for the seat is Democratic Rep. Jacky Rosen. "Right now, the Republicans have all three branches of government," Rosen said. "So what we can do is try to hold their feet to the fire every way we can, because we don't have the votes to win."

In the days leading up to the November 2016 election, I taped an episode of Alt.Latino that was intended to be a musical healing session. For just about everyone in the country, the campaign season was rough ride and I had created a healing playlist for myself, which I then decided to share.

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And to Lulu in Nevada now because it is election year, and politics isn't contained to Capitol Hill. Right, Lulu?

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In the past year, women have come forward with their stories of sexual harassment and abuse by men across politics, business and journalism. Multiple media organizations have fired or suspended male executives accused of harassment, including NPR.

But the photojournalism world has largely been absent from the #MeToo conversation — and not because there's no aching for one.

"Photojournalism needs to face its #MeToo moment" — that's according to Kainaz Amaria, a visuals editor at Vox and formerly with NPR.

Sarah Smarsh grew up in rural Kansas — the fifth generation to farm the same land, riding tractors where her ancestors rode wagons. There was never enough money and prospects were few. She was part of the what has become popularized as the white working class. But back then, she didn't know it.

Diana Evans' new novel is about two couples who — as John Legend sang — are "right in the thick of love."

Evans took her title, Ordinary People, from Legend's song. The whole album Get Lifted, she says, "is very narrative" as it tells the story of "what can happen in a long-term relationship."

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