Don Rush

Assoc. Program Director- Sr. Producer News and Public Affairs

Don Rush is the News Director at Public Radio Delmarva (WSCL/WSDL) in Salisbury, Maryland on the campus of Salisbury University. He has spent the last 35 years in broadcast journalism specializing in national politics. Before coming to Salisbury he spent 12 years in Washington DC with the Pacifica Network News bureau. During the 1980’s he was News Director at KFPK in his home town of Los Angeles. He also worked for the Los Angeles based wire and audio news service CNS/RNW. Locally, he has become an award winning journalist covering everything from development and environmental issues to local politics.

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The photo op of President Trump with a bible in his hand has sparked outrage among religious leaders in the country. Delmarva Public Radio Essayist George Merrill was taken by that act and what it symbolized about the president.

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Salisbury Mayor Jake Day has departed for a ten month mission with his National Guard unit. Before leaving Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush talked with the mayor about the death of George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer and the subsequent protests.

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With the wave of protests over the death of George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer Delmarva Publid Radio's Don  Rush talks with Charolotte King, chair of the Southern Delaware Alliance for Racial Justice, about the impact on the nation. (Part 2) Interview was conducted before charge was upgraded to second degree felony murder against Derek Chauvin and abettng counts filed against three other officers who were involved in his death.

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The coronavirus pandemic may have disappeared from television screens in the wake of death of George Floyd at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer, but the death toll continues rise at now over a 100,000 in the United States. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush talks with two nurses about what they expect to see in the coming months.

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Protests continued across the country in the wake of the death of George Floyd, an African American man, at the hands of a white police officer. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush talks with Charlotte King Chair of the Southern Delaware Alliance for Racial Justice about her initial reaction to the video of Floyd's death. (Part 1)

    

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States are now beginning reopen after many issuing stay at home orders to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Delmarva Public Radio talks with two nurses about their concerns as people again start to socialize.

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Protests have spread across the country to demonstrate against the death of an African American man, George Floyd, at the hands of a white police officer in Minneapolis. Kirkland Hall, a local activist and a member of the Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconcilation Commission, tells Delmarva Publc Radio's Don Rush about his angish but also his strong objection to the violence that has occurred during the protests.

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Nurses often work 12 hours shifts with many in the covid units. But when their shift is over they must go home to their loved ones. And, they become concerned about spreading the virus. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush looks at what two nurses do to prevent the spread of the disease to those closest to them.

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The coronavirus has been especially hard on the eldlerly with nursing homes being one of the prime targets. Delmarva Today's Don Rush talks with Pattie Tingle, executive director of MAC center, and Leslie Hughes who has been self-isolating during the pandemic about the impact of the virus on seniors.

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Nurses are on the front lines in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush profiles two nurses who describe their first hand experience in treating Covid 19 patients. (Part 1)

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With the attention focused on a search to treat the coronavirus its impact on cancer patients can be overlooked. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush talks with Howard Burris, president of the American Society of Clinical Oncologists, about treating the disease in the age of the pandemic.

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The Maryland Comptroller's office is reaching out to residents who may very well have unclaimed property.
The 180-page list will be run in 30 newspapers with accounts worth nearly $64 million. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush talks with Comptroller Peter Franchot about this effort as well as his reaction to Governor Larry Hogan's decision to partially reopen restaurants.

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One of the keys to the tourist season are rentals. Just this week, Governor John Carney (D-DE) lifted the temporary ban on short-term rentals beginning June 1. Lee Ann Wilkinson is CEO of Lee Ann Wilkinson Group Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Gallo Realty. She told Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush prior to the governor's decision that these rentals were essential for the tourist season.

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The economic downturn from the coronavirus pandemic is expected to last months with some predictions into 2021. Lee Ann Wilkinson, CEO of Lee Ann Wilkinsion Group, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Gallo Realty, says she is nonetheless optimistic as compared to the hit the industry took in 2008.

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While much of the attention during coronavirus restrictions has been placed on restaurants and other small businesses, the real estate industry has also seen a downturn. Lee Ann Wilkinson is CEO of Lee Ann Wilkinson Group, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Gallo Realty. She tells Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush that there was a decline as the pandemic hit earlier this year. Fadwa Webster provided production assistance for this series.

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Maryland Comtproller Peter Franchot has called for a partial reopening of restaurants as the state begins easing restrictions that have resulted from the coronavirus pandemic.

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Nurses are on the front lines in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. Delmarva Today's host Don Rush talks with two who work at the Peninsula Regional Medical Center. Elizabeth Townsend is works in the emergency center and Karen Dunn has been working in the Covid unit. They described what it is like to treat patients with this disease.

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Humor can often be lost in times like these. Delmarva Public Radio Essayist George Merrill suggests that we should recapture that sense of irony.

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — More than 51,000 Maryland residents filed for unemployment last week. The state's labor department reported Thursday that 51,108 people filed for unemployment benefits. That's down from 65,805 people who filed for benefits the week before that. More than 607,000 Maryland residents have filed for unemployment in the last nine weeks. The U.S. Labor Department says roughly 38.6 million people have filed for jobless aid in the United States since the coronavirus forced millions of businesses to close their doors and shrink their workforces. Meanwhile, Maryland Gov.

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As the Delmarva beach towns begin to reopen after the coronavirus restrictions, local restaurants are hoping to make up for the lost business. Kevin Roberts is co-owner of Bethany Blues that has two locations - one in Lewes and one in Bethany Beach. He says he is hopeful to recover some of what has been lost as the tourist season gets underway.

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With the restaurant industry struggling against the impact of the coronavirus, some had already begun to gear up for takeout and delivery by the time governmental restrictions were put in place. Kevin Roberts is co-owner of Bethany Blues that has two locations -- one in Lewes and one in Bethany Beach. Roberts tells Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush about how they geared up for the restrictions. Production assistance from Fadwa Webster.

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Many restaurants are hopeful as the restrictions ease up on those flocking to the Delmarva Beaches. In part two of our interview with Jeff Gosnear, vice president of Grotto Pizza, he tells Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush about some of the governmental financial assistance he has received but still worries about the future of the industry.

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With the partial reopening of the Delmarva beaches many local businesses are hoping for a decent tourist season in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. Jeff Gosnear, vice president of Grotto Pizza, told Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush that last weekend's partial reopening looks promising. Production assistance from Fadway Webster.

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For the elderly the coronavirus often brings loneliness. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush talks with Marcie Fairbanks, director of Family Servics for Capital Caring Health about what they can do to breakout of such isolation.

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The coronavirus pandemic and the accompanying economic downturn has cut deeply into Maryland state revenues. Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot told Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush that by 2022 it could cut into the state budget by as much as $2.6 billion to $4 billion depending on its severity.

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Sussex County is considered a hot spot with the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic. And, even local officials have expressed concerned about its rise. Georgetown Mayor Bill West and Town Manager Gene Dvornick told Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush that while their concerns have eased somewhat since the initial spike they are still committed to keeping a close eye on the outbreak.

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DOVER, Del. (AP) — Officials in Delaware’s largest beach resort are planning to slowly begin welcoming visitors amid Democratic Gov. John Carney’s ongoing stay-at-home order aimed at stemming the spread of the coronavirus. Rehoboth Beach commissioners agreed Tuesday to reopen the city’s beach and boardwalk on Friday for foot traffic, although sunbathing, sitting and swimming will remain off-limits. Visitors will be required to wear masks and practice social distancing.

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So far in the 21st century the nation has experienced two economic downturns -- one caused by a finance crisis and one by the current coronavirus pandemic. Gene Speriling, a former economic advisor to presidents Obama and Clinton and author of a new book Economic Dignity, tells Delmarav Public Radio's Don Rush that it is time to go beyond the numbers to reevaluate work. (Part 2)

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DOVER, Del. (AP) — Delaware agriculture officials have announced that farmers markets will be allowed to reopen Friday after being closed for nearly two months amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Delaware Department of Agriculture announced the reopening Monday and detailed a series of protocols that would be enacted to help the sites operate safely. Under the new rules, markets won't be allowed to host entertainment shows or activities and food trucks and prepared food won't be offered for consumption on-site.

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With the unemployment rate just under 15 percent the coronavirus pandemic the economic outlook for the near future is uncertain. Gene Sperling, an economic adivisor to presidents Obama and Clinton and author of a new book "Economic Dignity" tells Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush that he does not expect a quick turn around as we head into the second half of the year. (Part 1)

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